Guitar for 8 year old

Steve

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My daughter has been showing quite a bit of interest in music lately. She is constantly either in the front room hitting the piano or sneaking in my office while I'm playing my Epi LP and strumming my acoustic hanging on the wall. :p

So, I'm going to look into getting her a guitar though I'm not really sure where to start her at. Classical of course has nylon strings which would be easier from the start but upgrading to a steel string would mean a new guitar so my question is would I be able to string a normal acoustic with nylon strings for her to get the feel of things? Also any recommendations on a guitar would be appreciated, budget I'd say is $75-$120.
 

Tracy Perry

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I know it's a little outside the budget, but seriously look at the Yamaha JR2. If she decides she doesn't like it, it's still a decent size parlor guitar that you will get some use from. I'd actually (personally) lean more towards a JR2S (solid spruce top). They are priced MSRP at $252/260.52 currently but actual prices on the big box store sites are around $160 for the JR2.

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MusiciansFriend currently has 3 open box on for $127.99 if you don't mind some small blemishes on it and saving $33 or so.


The reviewer in the above video says it's a good guitar for ages 5-10.
Kids Guitarist said it was a great guitar for kids 7-11.

It looks like the JR2S is rather hard to find.

EDITED:
Derp... guess I need to go back to school to learn subtraction...or wake up more when I try to do it.
 
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zappaDPJ

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Nylon or steel is very much a personal choice even for a beginner but either way I'd strongly recommend having the guitar properly setup. Factory setups at that end of the market are usually not suitable for a beginner. The worst thing you can do is give a beginner a guitar that's hard to play.

Steel and nylon strings are not interchangeable, you have to choose one or the other.

I would probably recommend the Yamaha JR1 (steel) because I'm familiar with it and because it's just within your budget. I'm not familiar with the JR2s but the majority of Yamaha acoustic guitars I've played have been decent. I've used one for many years for both live and studio work.
 

Tracy Perry

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Looks line one of the main differences is between the back/side wood. The JR1 is shown to use meranti and the JR2 is mahogany and the JR2 uses a UTF (ultra thin finish).
Other than that, the specs are the same for everything else. From what little reading I did, meranti is also referred to as Philippine mahogany and is lighter and softer than many other of the "mahogany" line. It is also considered to be more brittle than "standard" mahogany. With it being a guitar for a kid, the less brittle may be better in the long run.
 

Tracy Perry

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Electrics are definitely easier to play as far as string control goes.
Ironically... electrics are also the guitar that is currently struggling in the market. Apparently has to do with few bands with any good guitar leads like the older generations had.
 

Steve

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So my boy got a little jealous it seemed when his sister got to sit and play my electric guitar. So a couple days later I asked him to come and try it out, first the Fender acoustic then the Epi LP. He got so attached he didn't want to stop (Side note, the wife and I think he may have a slight case of ADHD) so I had to tell him once you get frustrated with something it is time to take a breather then come back the next day and try again. Anyhow it was enough to show me he was interested and could be a nice thing to keep him off the electronics (Xbox/iPod) more so I ordered this for him.

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Jackson/JS-Series-Dinky-Minion-JS1X-Electric-Guitar-K35252.gc

He's a bit more of a "rocker" compared to my daughter so I thought why not :p
 

Tracy Perry

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That's one nice thing about our kids being grown.... don't have to share!
Although I AM thinking about a keyboard (electric piano most likely) to give to my son to mess with to see if he likes it. I let him try the 00-17se out and it hurt his left arm, which he had a compound fracture that required SS plates as a kid. Tried to tell him odds are it was tendons needing to stretch, but he's kind of like his mother in that if it causes pain, it's not going to be continued.

He really needs to get a hobby as he is "all about work" right now.
 

Steve

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Has he tried holding the guitar in the classical position? Usually a bit more relax that way for the left arm.

So I went to pick up the boys Jackson guitar and I guess when me and my daughter left he grabbed this little acoustic we have (cheapo $30 missing strings) and started playing what I was trying to show him the other day, Happy Birthday - 0-0-2-0-5-4 | 0-0-2-0-7-5 | 0-0-12-9-5-4-2 | 10-10-9-5-7-5 on the G string as it doesn't have the little E lol. He remembered the first bit and by the time I got back he was playing it just about right. :p
 

Tracy Perry

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Has he tried holding the guitar in the classical position? Usually a bit more relax that way for the left arm.
Yep... the issue is with his wrist/hand. It puts a strain on the tendons over where the break was. About the only one he could probably play would be a lap steel guitar.
 

Steve

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So we're about to jump in the car and head back to Guitar Center to return the Jackson Dinky. The little E string won't stay on the nut and the action is crazy low, like 1mm off the fret in the middle and nearly touching around the 2nd/3rd fret. Trading it in on another mini strat I think.
 

Tracy Perry

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Think I may have a loose tuner head on the 5th string of my Breedlove. If it is, I'll be doing the same visit to GC to get a refund.
 
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