Parlor size guitars

Tracy Perry

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I've been really happy with my Martin 00-17SE on the size and the sound of it. It's small enough to be able to comfortably sit on a couch with but still is a little large to carry in the convertible.
I've been looking at parlor guitars like the Eastman E10P & E20P along with Taylor GS Mini, the Takamine P3NY New Yorker (really love the sound of this one), the Gibson 1932 L-00 Vintage Reissue (really leery of any Gibson acoustic with their current history), the Epiphone EL-00 PRO (supposedly has a slighter larger body than a true parlor size) and the Washburn R320SWR and then finally the Martin 0-28VS.
The main reason is that being smaller, they may be easier to carry in the convertible and I may get lucky enough that they would fit in the trunk. :cool:

Right now I'm leaning towards the Taylor GS Mini, the P3NY or the Washburn. I really need to find a shop that has them in stock, but odds are the Washburn will be harder to find locally (within 75 miles).
I'd love to grab the Martin (keep the stable of acoustics all Martin you know!) but I'm not crazy about the $3800 (roughly) price.
 

Steve

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Haven’t looked at any myself but I feel you on the size. When I got my T-Bucket I was really surprised at the size, the Les Paul seems tiny in comparison when switching over to it in a session. I have been looking at some smaller body guitars for my kids though I don’t think I’ll be spending much on them.
 

Tracy Perry

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My shoulders won't stand playing a dread for long... the OM/000 size is just about right for me, but the 00 is great when sitting back relaxed on the couch... but it takes up the whole passenger seat in the convertible which prohibits the better half from going anywhere.
Don't really want to get a travel guitar as I've never heard one that really sounded worth a darn.
I haven't gotten to play with any 0 (parlor) size guitars yet, so I've got a sneaking suspicion that they aren't going to be noticeably smaller - as in small enough to fit in trunk. Probably would need a ukulele. :oops:

And since it's going to be a "travel" guitar, I'm not leaning towards spending a lot of money on it as it will be much more apt to get damaged.
 

Tracy Perry

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I have been looking at some smaller body guitars for my kids though I don’t think I’ll be spending much on them.
Look seriously at the Yamaha JR2 series.
I just found it on the Yamaha site... and looks like it may fit my portability requirement just fine and it's only about $160.
 

Tracy Perry

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Well, I decided on an Ibanez AVN10. Should be in sometimes this week.
I don't know if I'll like the slotted head (for looks they are great) as I hear they can be a tad bit of a pain to change strings on.



AVN10_BVS_1X_01.png
 

Tracy Perry

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I debated between the AVN10 and AVN9 and decided I liked the sound a little better on the AVN10.

 

zappaDPJ

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The AVN10 sounds a lot more vibrant which is not what I would have expected at all. Thicker lacquer finishes tend to choke sound so I'm not quite sure what's going on there. Perhaps there are build variations that I can't see.

I don't know a great deal about Ibanez acoustic guitars but I use a mid range RG Premium electric for rehearsing because it's light, easy to play and incredibly versatile. What I love about the entire Ibanez range of guitars is their quality control and attention to detail is superb no matter where they are made.
 

Tracy Perry

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TPerhaps there are build variations that I can't see.
The AVN10 is described with solid mahogany back and sides and the AVN9 is described with mahogany back/side (which I have found to frequently indicate a laminate of some type). What few comments I have found on the AVN9 that mention the back and sides indicates that it is solid though. :unsure:

The video was really surprising on how nice they sounded... I'm looking forward to getting the AVN10 in. If it's not as vocal as it appears I may send it back and save up the money for a Martin.
 

zappaDPJ

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My experience with Ibanez has always been rock solid. They seem to be able to deliver value beyond their pricing so it should be pretty good. I'll be interested to hear more about it.
 

Tracy Perry

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Well, the new AVN10 came in today. Was a little worried when I opened the box and found the strap button sticking through the packing and having made a dent on the bottom of the box... but looking at it I found no cracks around it.

One thing I have noticed... and I think this is more my hearing than the guitar, but when playing on the 3rd string/3rd fret it sounds rather "flat" when compared to the other notes. I can duplicate this on the equivalent string/fret on the 5th string/13th fret. The weird thing is though I can do the same on the Martin's and it's a much more distinctive sound. So it's really hard for me to figure out what exactly it may be.

I'm going to take this one to the lesson tomorrow and see what my instructor thinks. I've got a feeling I'm just spoiled to the Martin guitars though.

As for looks.. it's a REALLY beautiful guitar.
 

Tracy Perry

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You tell me if it's my imagination or not. Both 3rd string and 5th string.
First up is a Martin 000-18, second is Martin 00-17se and last is the Ibanez AVN10.
I'm a little slow because the muscle relaxant is finally kicking in. o_O
 

zappaDPJ

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One thing I have noticed... and I think this is more my hearing than the guitar, but when playing on the 3rd string/3rd fret it sounds rather "flat" when compared to the other notes. I can duplicate this on the equivalent string/fret on the 5th string/13th fret. The weird thing is though I can do the same on the Martin's and it's a much more distinctive sound. So it's really hard for me to figure out what exactly it may be.
It may not be your hearing, dead spots and 'wolf notes' (bright spots) occur because the guitar is made out of a natural substance. I've seen people add mass (weights) to the head stock to try and remove it. I believe there's a clamp for sale called a Fat finger to do just that although it's primary use is probably to try and add sustain. Here's a simple rather extreme variation.

Really_Fat_Finger.jpg


Something as extreme as that will probably cause the dead spot to move around the neck or it may remove it completely. The body on one of my electric guitars noticeably vibrates more when certain notes are played. I use it in the studio a lot because it sounds amazing. It also weighs about 12Ibs which I why I don't gig with it. In short, it happens and it's generally nothing to worry about but...

Was a little worried when I opened the box and found the strap button sticking through the packing and having made a dent on the bottom of the box... but looking at it I found no cracks around it.
This concerns me enough suggest you get a second opinion from someone with experience. There's a small possibility the truss rod has been damaged. It's unlikely but a loose truss rod could cause what you are describing.

What I can hear on your video is something different although you should keep in mind I'm partially deaf and have tinnitus from a life time spent playing loud music without ear protection. Playing the same note on a different string will vary in depth because the strings vary in length and gauge. Longer, thicker strings will move more and therefore sound louder, fuller and sustain for longer. It's the primary reason why electric guitar pickups are angled towards the thinner strings.

Nice beard btw :p:D
 

Tracy Perry

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Playing the same note on a different string will vary in depth because the strings vary in length and gauge. Longer, thicker strings will move more and therefore sound louder, fuller and sustain for longer. It's the primary reason why electric guitar pickups are angled towards the thinner strings.
Yeah... the different strings were just as a comparison that on the parlor on both strings the same note sounded rather dead to me (leaning more towards my hearing than the guitar). The more I've played with it the more I am thinking it's a combination of 2 things.
#1 My hearing isn't that good (years of shooting guns with no hearing protection with the resultant hearing loss and tinnitus)
#2 A parlor simply doesn't project as well as the larger bodies do

The box damage wasn't severe.... just something I noticed, especially since you could tell it had repeatedly rested on it. But this was an interior box (the original Ibanez box) that was inside the shipping box to "hide" the content.
As you can see, their protective wrapping is more for scratch protection than bump protection.

parlor1.jpg
parlor-2.jpg

Nice beard btw
Thanks! It's taken a bit to get it as long as it is... plan on letting it get a little longer and will trim the sides down after Christmas, but was told I needed a "Santa" beard for Christmas time.
 
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