Scales - where is the best place to start?

Steve

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Guitar Player
I'm getting into scales and I'm feeling a bit lost on where I should concentrate my efforts. The Minor scale seems a bit easier but the positions and the C D E G A B minor scales. Should I just simply start with the C and work from there? Any help is appreciated!
 

zappaDPJ

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The minor pentatonic scale is the place to start but it's not so much about learning the scale (it is after all as easy as pie), it's more about how you play it and what you can do with it.

For example, flying fingers. You don't want them so you need to focus on keeping your finger movements to an absolute minimum when moving between notes. You also need to focus on which fingers to use where. A lot of new players tend use their ring finger when they would be better served in the long run developing strength and control in their little finger.

There's also a heap of stuff to learn with your the other hand such as alternate picking (up/down strokes), finger picking, hand positioning, muting etc. etc.

You can then start to add some mojo to the scale in the form of the magical 'blues note'.

Watch this video (below), read the blurb. It's all very basic but it's road that leads to the blues note video above :)

https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-176-MinorPentatonic.php
 

Steve

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Guitar Player
Seen that video a few times now :)

More was looking for confirmation on where to start which your reply helps do that, thanks zappaDPJ zappaDPJ
 
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Tracy Perry

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Guitar Player
Minor pentatonic is what my instructor has me working on and using backing tracks from YouTube for it. Hardest thing is getting a smooth flow as I still have to "stop and think" every now and then whether it's 1st fret/4th or 1st/3rd (depending on what key it's in as to where you are on neck.
 

Steve

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Guitar Player
I can't even get my fingers to cooperate to do power chords very good. Still need to get to that point where I can spread my fingers more.
 

Mike Edge

Member
Yeah I'm teasing! Scales are very important to master. I took classical lessons for over 10 years so it explains my hatred, but yeah you need em for some rippin' solos haha

For learning power chords just start with simple power chord riffs.. Iron Man, Cat scratch fever, Smoke on The Water, Back in Black using the same few chords over and over
 

zappaDPJ

Well-known member
Staff member
Yeah I'm teasing! Scales are very important to master. I took classical lessons for over 10 years so it explains my hatred, but yeah you need em for some rippin' solos haha

For learning power chords just start with simple power chord riffs.. Iron Man, Cat scratch fever, Smoke on The Water, Back in Black using the same few chords over and over
I somehow managed to miss the last few posts in this thread.

Smoke on the Water played as it was originally recorded is a great way to get a lot of early satisfaction out playing an electric guitar, especially if there's a bit of distortion involved.

As this is the 'Music Theory' section we should have some :unsure: Smoke on the Water is usually incorrectly played using strummed power chords, that is a chord consisting of the root and fifth notes e.g.

01.gif


I believe the original version was recorded using plucked fourths e.g.

F03_29.gif


This video may at first appear to over complicate things but if you view it with the above diagram in mind it should become clearer.

 
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